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History

'We cannot escape history and neither can we escape a desire to understand it.' Anon

Meet the History team

Meet the tutors who will share their passion for History as you study at Crompton House School.

How are students assessed?

Students are assessed every half-term through a levelled extended piece of writing. This could be a range of tasks from writing a diary entry, to creating a newspaper article and even writing a structured essay.

How are students grouped?

Student are set in line with the other subjects within the Humanities group, from set 1 to set 4.

What home learning are we expected to do?

Students are given one piece of homework every week. These homework tasks will complement and extend the work done in class.

How can parents help?

Parents can help by assisting pupils with research, ensuring homework is completed and handed in on time. Allowing the students the opportunity to talk through events to enhance their chronological understanding and encourage students to analyse the reason for and consequences of key points in History.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curriculum Breakdown

What will the pupils be studying each term?How will the pupils be assessed?
Autumn Term
Introduction to Middle Ages and Battle of Hastings
Who fought who? 1066 – the year of three battles
Students evaluate and reflect upon a number of factors produce an essay
which answers the question – Why did William of Normand win the Battle of Hastings?
What did people believe in the middle ages?Students use their knowledge and understanding to produce an empathetic account of a Day in the Life of Monk Diary.
Spring Term
‘William didn’t conquer Britain – he created it!’ Do you agree?
Was the Black Death really a disaster?
Students carry out their own independent research and analyse a range of primary and secondary sources to produce a booklet on the Black Death.
The rise of the Tudor family.
Royal Rollercoaster, Tudor life,
Henry VIII, the Reformation
Bloody Mary, Elizabeth, Mary Queen of Scots
Students examine a range of sources which put forward two different interpretations of Mary I and reach their own conclusion to decide whether or not Mary deserves the title of ‘Bloody Mary’
Summer Term
The Aztecs
Why were Europeans mad about Empires?
Students design and complete a “Traveller’s Guide to Understanding the Aztecs” by using the knowledge and understanding they have gained from their investigations.
Armada
How (not) to invade Britain! Why did the Spanish Armada fail?
Students draw links from the Norman Invasion and asses the main reasons why the Spanish Armada failed. As art of their investigation they enhance their knowledge and understanding of the key events and study a range of primary and secondary sources before reaching a conclusion.
What will the pupils be studying each term?How will the pupils be assessed?
Autumn Term
The story so far and the next chapter. Pupils are introduced to the big picture.
The Rise of the Industrial City!
The Industrial towns were death traps: how far is this true?
Students carry out research into what life was like for Children in the Mills.
As part of this process they analyses a range of primary and secondary sources to consider bias. As part of their assessment they create a ‘sensational newspaper report’ from the point of view of a Victorian journalist which uncovers the stories of child workers.
Jack the Ripper.
Topic : The Battle for Law and Order. What can the White chapel murders tell us about the problems of Victorian society?
As a result of taking part in a series of lessons around the Jack the Ripper murders, students complete an assessment in lesson based around source evaluation and their own knowledge. A part of this they put forward their own point of view as to who they think was most likely to have been Jack and their reasons why.
Spring Term
First World War and Life in the Trenches
The experience of ordinary people:
What do people’s stories tell us about World War One?
First World War and Life in theTrenches
The experience of ordinary people: What do people’s stories tell us about World War One?
The Rise of Evil: What was life like in Nazi Germany?Student’s place themselves in the shoes of a young person who has experienced the rise and establishment of the Third Reich. They write a letter to a friend/ relative in USA outlining the key changes they have experienced and the impact such have had on their lives.
Summer Term
The Holocaust: How did life change for Jewish people in Europe 1933-1945?This assessment revolves around a source analysis task during which students apply their knowledge and understanding of the Final Solution.
Life on the Home front in WW2
The Spirit of the Blitz: Reality of myth?
In order to prepare students for GCSE style evaluation and investigations, they are provided with sources which offer 2 interpretations of Life on the Home Front. Using those sources and the knowledge they have gained from their studies, students reach a judgement to determine whether or not the Blitz Spirit existed.

Autumn Term

Medicine Through Time
Developments in medicine (Surgery & Anatomy; Disease & Infection; Public Health)

  • Prehistory
  • Ancient Egypt
  • Ancient Greece
  • Ancient Rome
  • Middle Ages
  • Renaissance

Assessement: End of Unit Tests

Spring Term

Medicine Through Time
Developments in medicine (Surgery & Anatomy; Disease & Infection)

  • The Industrial Age
  • The Present

Assessment: End of Unit Tests

Summer Term

Medicine Through Time
Developments in medicine (Public Health)

  • The Industrial Age
  • The Present

Controlled Assessment: History around us

  • Industrial Revolution at Quarry Bank Mill

Assessment: End of Unit Tests & Controlled Assessment

Autumn Term

Medicine Through Time
Developments in medicine (Surgery & Anatomy; Disease & Infection; Public Health)

  • Prehistory
  • Ancient Egypt
  • Ancient Greece
  • Ancient Rome
  • Middle Ages
  • Renaissance

Assessement: End of Unit Tests

Spring Term

Medicine Through Time
Developments in medicine (Surgery & Anatomy; Disease & Infection)

  • The Industrial Age
  • The Present

Assessment: End of Unit Tests

Summer Term

Medicine Through Time
Developments in medicine (Public Health)

  • The Industrial Age
  • The Present

Controlled Assessment: History around us

  • Industrial Revolution at Quarry Bank Mill

Assessment: End of Unit Tests & Controlled Assessment

Autumn Term
Controlled Assessment: Historical Enquiry – The British People in War
Assessment: Controlled Assessment

Spring Term
Weimar Germany 1919-1933
Key issue: How far do the early problems of the Weimar Republic suggest that it was doomed fromthe start?

  • The origins of the Weimar Republic; the armistice; the effects of the Treaty of Versailles
  • Political problems: the constitution and its consequences for government; political instability
  • Challenges to Weimar, 1919–1923: the Spartacists; attempted takeovers by the right wing: the Freikorps;
  • Kapp Putsch; Munich Putsch
  • Economic problems leading to hyperinflation; the invasion of the Ruhr.

Key issue: How far did the Weimar Republic recover under Stresemann?

  • The role of Stresemann, as Chancellor and then Foreign Minister
  • The recovery of the economy: new currency; the Dawes and Young Plans
  • Developments in international relations: Locarno Pact, League of Nations, Kellogg-Briand Pact
  • The extent of recovery – politically, economically and culturally.

Key issue: How far did the Nazi Party develop its ideas and organisation up to 1929?

  • Early career of Hitler; German Workers’ Party under Drexler; early development of the Nazi Party
  • The Munich Putsch and its consequences; Mein Kampf
  • Decline in support in the Stresemann years; consolidation of Nazi organisation in the later 1920s.

Race Relations in the USA 1945–1968
Key issue: To what extent did racial inequality exist in the USA after the Second World War?

  • African-American soldiers experience of war; segregation laws; attitudes in the Southern States; the Ku Klux Kla
  • Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, 1955–1956
  • Brown versus Topeka Board of Education
  • Little Rock High School,1957
  • Living standards for African-Americans.

Key issue: How effective were the methods used by members of the Civil Rights Movement between 1961–1968?

  • The Freedom Rides, 1961; Freedom Marches 1963
  • The Washington March, 1963
  • Black Power protests at the Mexico Olympics, 1968
  • The Black Power movement in the 1960s.

Key issue: How important was Martin Luther King in the fight for Civil Rights in the USA?

  • His role as a protest organiser, 1955–1963
  • The Civil Rights Act, 1964
  • Winning the Nobel Peace Prize, 1964
  • Race Riots, 1965–1967
  • The assassination of Martin Luther King

Assessment: End of Unit Tests

Summer Term
Revision
Assessment: End of Unit Tests & Summer Examination

Option choice: GCSE History

Course highlights:

Throughout the course, students will complete 3 core components:

  • Medicine and Public Health Through Time Written Paper 1 hour 45 minutes = 35% of total marks
  • In Depth Enquiry: Germany – 1919 – 1945 Written Paper 2 – 1 hour 45 minutes = 40% of total marks
  • HISTORY AROUND US: Controlled assessment – 3 questions = 25% of total marks. Focus: The site of Quarry Bank Mill

Coursework will be completed in Year 11. Both exams to be completed in June of Yr 11.

Medicine and Public Health Through Time

Content: This unit contains three interrelated themes: Disease and Infection, Surgery and Anatomy and Public Health. The course will span across 4000 years from prehistoric times to modern day. The course is designed to help students to understand how peoples’ lives developed over this long period of time.

The section on Disease and Infection emphasises changing ideas and practices in the cause, prevention and cure of disease and infection. In Surgery and Anatomy there is a concentration on the changes in the understanding of anatomy and the practice of surgery. In the section on Public Health, with a focus on Britain, the emphasis is on the changing role of government, both local and national, in providing health facilities for the people.

Germany, 1919–1945

Content: This Enquiry in Depth focuses on the causes of the development of totalitarianism and its impact in Germany in the period 1919–1945. The Enquiry requires investigation of developments and conditions in Weimar Germany as a basis for explaining Hitler’s rise to power and as an evaluation of the contemporary appeal and impact of National Socialism. It also requires an understanding of the reactions of individual people and groups to developments within Germany in the period.

Students will be provided with an insight into life in Nazi Germany and how the regime impacted on different social groups within Germany.

How you are going to learn on this course:

You will learn through a variety of learning methods. Activities in the past have included analysis of a range of primary sources (including film, newspapers, photographs, diary entries) drama, card sorts, class discussions, group debates and paired collaboration.

You should be aware that due to the academic and complex nature of the course, a considerable amount of written independent work will be involved, and you will be expected to have a good standard of literacy.

How it is assessed:

There are 2 examinations at the end of Year 11.

  • Medicine and Public Health Through Time Written Paper 1 hour 45 minutes = 35% of total marks
  • In Depth Enquiry: Germany – 1919 – 1945 Written Paper 2 – 1 hour 45 minutes = 40% of total marks

The Controlled Assessment will take place in lesson time during Year 11. HISTORY AROUND US: Controlled assessment – 3 questions = 25% of total marks. Focus: The site of Quarry Bank Mill

Pathways and careers leading from this subject

History is a traditional academic subject and as such is highly valued by both employers and universities.

Skills such as source analysis, recognition of bias, examination of evidence and being able to construct well reasoned arguments based on evidence are much needed skills in the modern world.

A qualification in history could lead to jobs related to Law – solicitors, barristers, police work. Many historians go on to work in the media- press and TV work where research skills are needed. Jonathan Ross, Louis Theroux and Melvyn Bragg all studied History.

Course combinations:

History goes well with any other GCSE option.

Other information:

If you are interested in the History course and would like more information then you may ask your History teacher to discuss the course with you. You may also look at the main course textbook to see some more in depth topic areas.

Who to see for more information:

Head of Department: Mrs Heywood

Course Teachers:

  • Mrs Robinson
  • Mrs Lomas
  • Ms Ryan
  • Miss Watkins

You can speak to your Form Tutor, Head of House and Assistant Head of House for more advice.

GCSE Specification

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GCSE Specification

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